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The Big Picture

Australian Cancer Research Foundation

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  • What is lung cancer?
    Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death for men and women
  • Existing treatment could halt lung cancer progression
    Cancer researchers at Hudson Institute of Medical Research have discovered a potential new way to halt the progress of lung cancer and emphysema
  • 2016 ACRF CANCER RESEARCH GRANTS ANNOUNCED
    Each year, ACRF challenges the Australian cancer research community to propose projects that are bold and have potential to make a significant impact on cancer prevention, detection and treatment.
  • Let's end cancer together
    The donations we receive fund research in to prevention, diagnosis and treatment of all types of cancer. Your generosity funds technology to fast-track discoveries that have the power to change the lives of cancer patients and their families.
  • WORKING DURING AND AFTER CANCER TREATMENT – MORE SUPPORT NEEDED
    Coming back to work after cancer treatment, or working during, will not come as easy as before diagnosis.

LEARN MORE ABOUT LUNG CANCER AND RESEARCH, INCLUDING LUNG CANCER SYMPTOMS, TREATMENT
AND PREVENTION

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Lung cancer incidence rate generally increases with age. In 2016 in Australia, it is estimated that the risk of an individual being diagnosed with lung cancer by their 85th birthday will be 1 in 17 (1 in 13 males and 1 in 22 females).

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The lung.cancerresearch site provides news, information and leading opinions on lung cancer treatment, prevention, diagnosis and cure. Our topics include information on lung cancer, lung cancer symptoms, risk, screening, treatment options as well as the latest related lung cancer research news.

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Our growing collection of articles is not designed to provide medical or professional advice and is for support and information only. If you have any health problems or questions please consult your doctor.

Types of Lung Cancer

In Australia, lung cancer is one of the five most commonly diagnosed cancers, and causes more deaths than any other type of cancer. It has a 5-year survival rate of about 14%.

There are two types of lung cancer: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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While the cause of NSCLC cannot be identified in every case, people who develop this cancer are usually smokers, or have been smokers in the past.

There are a number of risk factors associated with developing lung cancer...

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Lung cancers diagnosed early are usually found by accident, such as when testing for other medical conditions. More often, the cancer is already advanced by the time symptoms appear.

There are a number of symptoms that develop, including a persistent cough, coughing up blood in the sputum...

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Aside from taking a medical history and conducting a physical examination, a number of tests may be done to diagnose lung cancer.

Such tests include a chest x-ray and laboratory testing of samples e.g. sputum, blood, urine.

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NSCLC can be treated with several different types of treatment, depending on the stage of the cancer at diagnosis and other factors. The main treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or a combination of these.

Surgery may be an option for people with early-stage lung cancer.

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After treatment for lung cancer finishes, regular follow-up visits are required into the future. During these visits, tests such as blood tests, CT scans, or x-rays may be done, as well as physical examinations.

Follow-up is done to check for any signs of the cancer returning, as well as to look for late effects of the treatments received.

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Lung cancer is one of the five most commonly diagnosed cancers in Australia. It usually occurs in people over the age of 65 years, but can affect younger adults.

Lung cancer causes more deaths than any other type of cancer in Australia, and has a 5-year survival rate of about 14%.

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While the cause of SCLC cannot be identified in every case, people who develop this cancer are usually smokers, or have been smokers in the past.

Tobacco smoking (cigarettes, pipes or cigars), exposure to second-hand smoke (smoke breathed out by others) and a family history of lung cancer, are some of the risk factors than can increase the risk of developing lung cancer.

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Lung cancers diagnosed early are usually found by accident, such as when testing for other medical conditions.

More often, the cancer is already advanced by the time symptoms appear.

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Aside from taking a medical history and conducting a physical examination, a number of tests may be done to diagnose lung cancer.

Such tests can include a biopsy (removing a sample of lung tissue for examination) and a chest x-ray for example.

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Treatment for SCLC depends on a number of factors, including the stage of the cancer. In cases of early-stage lung cancer, where the cancer is contained to one lung and nearby lymph nodes only, surgery may be possible.

In most cases however, the cancer has already spread by the time it is found, and other treatments are required.

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After treatment for lung cancer, follow-up visits are needed at regular intervals into the future.

During these visits, tests such as blood tests and CT scans may be done as well as physical examinations, to check for any signs of the cancer returning, as well as any late effects of treatments received.

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